Shifting Cooperation Paradigms:
Adapting to a changing context
in the COVID pandemic

Cooperation Canada’s Online Development Series of bi-weekly panels, trainings, workshops and networking events on trending topics!

Cooperation Canada is hosting bi-weekly, high-value virtual sessions, bringing innovative and challenging ideas to the international development sector in Canada.  Diverse stakeholders will prompt thought-provoking discussions on topics related to the major trends affecting the international cooperation sector in a COVID-19 era.  These sessions will help inform sector leaders about some of the issues they should consider as the pandemic crisis continues to impact the international cooperation sector. The series aims to: 

  • Inform Cooperation Canada member leaders (and others) of the key trends and issues facing the international cooperation sector given the pandemic crisis.  
  • Challenge Cooperation Canada members and others to proactively react and update their strategies and approaches considering the challenges facing the sector. 
  • Provide space for critical reflection and exchange through thought-provoking discussions by engaging leaders inside and outside the sector (moving beyond the ‘usual suspects’).

 

 Sessions are from 12 to 1:30 p.m. ET

Up Next: October 28

Click on pdf to access speaker bios

Series Overview 

Read about upcoming sessions

October 28: Advancing the anti-racist agenda in international cooperation

The most recent waves of popular uprising in response to pervasive and systemic racism across society has prompted sorely needed discussions about the steps international cooperation stakeholders are and should be taking.

Moderator

  • Gloria Novovic, Policy Analyst & GAC Departmental Liaison, Cooperation Canada

Panelists

 

November 12: Shifting Power; Direction and control as a key obstacle to localizing international assistance

Direction and Control regulations impose outdated and ineffective obligations on Canadian CSOs, expected to exercise full control of the activities and spending of their local partners. Directly in contradiction of the localization principles of the Grand Bargain, Canada’s CSOs are requested to impose rigid mechanisms of top-bottom hierarchy.  Canada’s CSOs, with the political leadership of Senator Ratna Omidvar, are proposing an alternative bill that would supplant the ‘direction and control’ approach with that of resource accountability.

Moderator:  

Panelists:

 

November 25: Change Leadership – Part 1: Key steps and common pitfalls in managing organizational change

In a COVID-era, operating contexts for CSOs are changing daily and leaders are grappling with important decisions to both manage risk and prepare for their next organizational opportunities.

Organizational change management is the systematic approach and application of knowledge, tools and resources to deal with change. It involves defining and adopting corporate strategies, structures, procedures and technologies to handle changes in external conditions and the business environment. Effective change management goes beyond project management and technical tasks undertaken to enact organizational changes. It also involves leading the “people side” of major change within an organization.

The primary goal of change management is to successfully implement new processes, products and business strategies while minimizing negative outcomes.

Part 1 of two sessions on change leadership will examine the key steps in managing significant organizational changes and common pitfalls to be avoided.

 

December 9: Change Leadership – Part 2: The People and Culture side of successful organizational change

In a COVID-era, operating contexts for CSOs are changing daily and leaders are grappling with important decisions to both manage risk and prepare for their next organizational opportunities.

Organizational change management is the systematic approach and application of knowledge, tools and resources to deal with change. It involves defining and adopting corporate strategies, structures, procedures and technologies to handle changes in external conditions and the business environment. Effective change management goes beyond project management and technical tasks undertaken to enact organizational changes. It also involves leading the “people side” of major change within an organization.

The primary goal of change management is to successfully implement new processes, products and business strategies while minimizing negative outcomes.

Part 2 of two sessions on change leadership will examine the people and culture components in managing significant organizational changes and common pitfalls to be avoided.

 

MORE TITLES TO FOLLOW IN 2021

Price & Registration

Single Event Registrations

Advancing the anti-racist agenda in international cooperation
Shifting Power: Direction and control as a key obstacle to localizing international assistance
Change Leadership – Part 1: Key steps and common pitfalls in managing organizational change
Change Leadership – Part 2: The People and Culture side of successful organizational change

Past Events

View past sessions

October 14: Shifting Power: localization and working with local partners, accelerating change in COVID-19 context

View the recording here.

While international cooperation partners have long committed to localization, notably through Grand Bargain commitments to ensure national and local ownership of humanitarian and development interventions, COVID-19 has accelerated discussions regarding the need to shift power and resources to partners in the Global South as part of a practical, effective and sustainable response. This session will identify and discuss practical approaches, challenges and opportunities for Canadian civil society and their donors to shift power through localization in responding to COVID-19.

 

Sept 30: Building Back Better: Defining the building blocks for a just global recovery from the pandemic

View the recording here.

The impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic are being felt in Canada and abroad with over 18 million cases reported worldwide. The crisis has yet to peak in the Global South. Yet the knock-on effects of the pandemic are becoming increasingly clear in the world’s most vulnerable countries with women carrying the biggest burdens, public health systems under massive pressures, economies shattered, trade relations interrupted, food insecurity on the horizon and human rights in peril as nativist policies take root and authoritarian states clamp down on civil society. And when effective treatments or COVID vaccines eventually become available, there will arise the question of having systems for their rapid and widespread distribution globally. And yet despite the challenges, the pandemic crisis has also expanded perspectives on what is possible – with governments grounding planes in a matter of weeks, countries like Canada rolling out a universal basic income by another name and a renewed recognition of the role of states and social policies to support those at risk of falling behind. Despite all the human loss, disruption and cost of the pandemic, an opportunity also exists for Canada and the world to emerge stronger and more resilient from the crisis. This session, co-hosted by CCIC and CIGI, will examine the key policy responses needed for sustainable, equitable, transformative and ambitious recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic. It will seek to define some of what a Global post-COVID “Marshall Plan” might include and what Canada’s role could be in supporting such a plan.
Panelists: ● Jennifer Welsh (McGill) ● Goldy Hyder (Business Council of Canada) ● Rohinton Medhora (Centre for International Governance Innovation – CIGI) ● Nicolas Moyer (Canadian Council for International Cooperation – CCIC)
Moderated by Dr. Bessma Momani (Centre for International Governance Innovation – CIGI)

 

 

 

September 9: Learning from Controversy: Effective approaches to international philanthropy and development

View the recording here.

Social justice movements have long called for change on issues relating to power, privilege, racism and colonialism. Like most segments of society, Canada’s international development sector and related stakeholders – NGOs, philanthropists, governments, investors, and other partners – have much work to do in these areas. Fortunately, our ability to improve on current practices will have a direct positive impact both on those we aspire to serve and on our own sector, in that we all benefit by living in more just and equitable societies. While recent news coverage related to WE Charity has brought some of these questions into greater public visibility, they have been talked about within parts of the NGO community for some time. It is perhaps less clear for those outside the sector what the required changes and discussions might look like in practice. For example, what basic questions should donors be asking of organizations that they are considering supporting…and of themselves? Donors, organizations, and impoverished populations or communities all have needs; how should they be balanced or prioritized? What values are most critical in order to carry out this work ethically and with integrity? What are reasonable time frames within which organizations and donors should expect to see results…and what kind of results can be expected to be achieved? A webinar with diverse voices from within and around Canada’s international development sector will dive deep into these questions. Panelists include: • Mide Akerewusi, Founder of AgentsC, a Toronto-based international philanthropy agency • Marika Anthony-Shaw, Founder and CEO, Plus1 • Mark Brender, National Director, Partners In Health Canada • Samantha Nutt, Founder, War Child • Dorothy Nyambi, CEO, MEDA Introduction from Nicolas Moyer, CEO of Canadian Council for International Cooperation (CCIC)

 

 

 

August 20: Liability, Duty of Care and Senior Leaders Responsibilities Training
This half-day workshop covers duty of care responsibilities through the use of a case study, and is jointly presented by CARE Canada’s Safety and Security Lead, Melanie Murphy and Paul Willetts, a founding partner of Vey Willets LLP in Ottawa, who will explain the legal responsibilities of senior leaders in full. It has been adapted to include Duty of Care implications of the COVID-19 pandemic. This training is catered to Boards of Directors, Presidents/CEOs/EDs and the members of their respective senior leadership teams, as well as safety and security and senior HR staff.

 

 

 

August 18: Lessons learned regarding how the Government of Canada and its partners support women’s rights organizations

View the recording here at 1:01:45.

CCIC and the Women’s Rights Policy Group invite you to join us on August 18 to discuss lessons learned regarding how the Government of Canada and its partners support women’s rights organizations. Drawing on experiences of Canadian civil society partners with the Women’s Voice and Leadership (WVL), this event will include an engaging discussion on how feminist approaches can enable civil society organizations, partners and Global Affairs Canada to best are adjusting to new realities and working to ensure effective support for women’s leadership rights organizations and feminist movements around the world.

 

 

 

August 12: Youth Day Networking Event

View the recording here.

As part of CCIC’s new Online Development Series and in celebration of International Youth Day, our first session will be a Youth Networking Event. This particular session will be focused on youth career paths in difficult times and solution-finding through tips and tricks from sector professionals from a noteworthy variety of backgrounds and experiences. CCIC will be joined by Ms. Clare da Silva, International Legal and Policy Consultant, Mr. Jos Nolle, former Executive Director of SENECA International, and Mr. Martin Callsen, Project Officer at Colleges and Institutes Canada. Gaining valuable skills through sound advice for a rewarding start in the international development and humanitarian assistance sectors starts here

Contact

Sponsorship:  Rachelle Daley  rdaley@cooperation.ca

Media: Kat Guerin  kguerin@cooperation.ca