Media Statement: CCIC Congratulates the Liberal Party of Canada for Winning the 2019 Federal Election

Media Statement: CCIC Congratulates the Liberal Party of Canada for Winning the 2019 Federal Election

Ottawa, ON (October 22, 2019) – The Canadian Council for International Co-operation (CCIC), Canada’s national association representing Canadian organizations working globally in sustainable development and humanitarian assistance, congratulates the Liberal Party of Canada for winning the federal election yesterday.  

CCIC would like to thank the Liberal Party of Canada for taking the time to answer our questionnaire to federal parties and share its stance and priorities relative to international development and foreign policy matters. We look forward to continuing to collaborate with the Government of Canada on these issues moving forward. We hope to see real increases in investments relative to Gross National Income which would allow for Canada’s impact to match the ambition of its progressive policies. 

CCIC has appreciated positive and productive relations with the Government of Canada, including strong working relationships with Ministers Marie-Claude Bibeau and Maryam Monsef. In the last few years, the government set ambitious targets through its Feminist International Assistance Policy to focus Canada’s international assistance on supporting gender equality as an essential element of sustainable development. This policy has tremendous potential to deliver lasting positive change for people around the world. CCIC hopes the Government of Canada will continue to engage with civil society organizations to establish the frameworks needed to achieve the objectives set in the policy. 

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Canada’s support for development cooperation is a measure of the importance it places on being a leader and doing its fair share in the world. CCIC looks forward to continue working with the Government of Canada to improve Canada’s international assistance, as part of how Canada can be a global leader in a fast changing and interconnected world.

Nicolas Moyer

President and CEO, Canadian Council for International Co-operation

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About the Canadian Council for International Co-operation (CCIC) 
The Canadian Council for International Co-operation (CCIC) is Canada’s national association representing international development and humanitarian organizations. Together with our member organizations, CCIC seeks to end global poverty and to promote social justice and human dignity for all. CCIC is committed to making this goal a public priority and to encouraging the actions necessary to make a poverty-free world a reality.  

 Media Contact:
Thida Ith, Media and Communications Officer
tith@ccic.ca / Phone: (613) 241-7007 ext. 343/ Cell phone: (437) 779-0883 

Humanitarian Discussions, Policy, and Funding

Humanitarian Discussions, Policy, and Funding

 

HRN Heads of Agencies Meeting

Leaders from members of the Humanitarian Response Network of Canada (HRN) met on September 30th in Montreal at the HRN Heads of Agency Meeting (HoA). This annual event convenes Executive Directors and CEOs of HRN members, their senior humanitarian staff, and Government of Canada representatives to discuss their collective experience in humanitarian response. The meeting contained rich discussions on a variety of topics within the theme of “The role of organisational leadership in strengthening the Canadian humanitarian system”.

The day started off with presentations from leaders on key issues affecting the sector as a whole. Humanitarian policy and funding, charitable regulations, and localization were brought forward as key issues to be tackled by the leaders in the room. A panel discussion was also held to dig deep into the nuances of working in the humanitarian-development-peace nexus, exploring how to uphold the humanitarian principles of impartiality, neutrality, independence, and humanity while integrating more sustainable, long-term, resilience-building, and gender-responsive solutions into responses to protracted crises and conflicts. Following the panel, 29 leaders of Canada’s humanitarian organisations signed a joint statement confirming their commitment to work in an integrated, inclusive and principled approach to enable better collaboration between the humanitarian, development and peace sectors. The statement, a first of its kind made by a group of heads of agencies in Canada, affirms that sustainable solutions for crisis-affected people must be the ultimate objective of all integrated approaches.

The afternoon was focused on organisations themselves, building on the policy and programming focus of the morning discussions. Sessions were held to encourage leaders to think about how to support a more diverse and inclusive sector, and an employer’s responsibility to take all steps reasonably possible to ensure the health, safety, and wellbeing of employees. The day ended with an inspiring keynote speech from Solange Tuyishime, CEO of Elevate International and UNICEF Canada ambassador. Overall the day was full of opportunities for leaders to connect with one another – a unique moment for the sector.

 

I found the topics quite relevant and believe that there was a lot there that could be taken back to my organization and followed up on. The diversity session was particularly useful for pushing us to think more about inclusion.

Participant feedback

Humanitarian Policy

At the meeting, CCIC presented a review of recent developments in humanitarian policy and funding. Below are the key messages:

After months of consultation through a far-reaching and highly consultative International Assistance Review, Canada launched its new Canada’s Feminist International Assistance Policy (FIAP) in June 2017. Humanitarian assistance was integrated within this Policy, grouped alongside health and nutrition and education as part of the “Human Dignity” action area.

Yet while humanitarian assistance was in some sense subsumed within the FIAP framework, it stood out in terms of implementation. Some two years later, in April 2019, Canada launched its Policy on Gender Equality in Humanitarian Action as the first of a set of policies on each of the action areas in the FIAP.

The story behind the leadership of the humanitarian sector in FIAP implementation is one of civil society engagement. At the end of 2017, as soon as the government announced that it would develop a suite of policies to guide the FIAP, the Humanitarian Policy and Advocacy Group at the Canadian Council for International Co-operation prepared a substantial and comprehensive joint submission proposing principles and activities for a feminist humanitarian policy. This followed up on the longstanding civil society ask for a defined Canadian humanitarian policy – something that, in the context of the FIAP, Global Affairs Canada (GAC) appeared prepared to deliver. In its submission, the humanitarian sector asked for an emphasis on an intersectional approach to humanitarian assistance that recognizes the nexus between humanitarian response, development, and peacebuilding.

After more than a year of back-and-forth between ministerial and bureaucratic staff at GAC, the humanitarian team there reached out in early 2019 to the Humanitarian Policy and Advocacy Group and the Humanitarian Response Network of Canada for input on a draft humanitarian policy. The humanitarian sector gave substantial feedback, noting opportunities to enhance rights-based language, clarify the scope, and strengthen the focus on intersectional nexus programming.

This feedback was quite well reflected in the final version of the policy presented at the World Bank and International Monetary Fund Spring Meetings in April 2019. The Humanitarian Policy and Advocacy Group made a joint statement in response to the launch.

As the strong commitments in the FIAP and the humanitarian policy are further implemented through internal guidance and plan, these should be developed jointly by GAC and civil society and informed by both policy and practice.

 

Humanitarian Funding

The change in Canadian humanitarian policy coincides with changes in Canadian humanitarian funding. These trends are presented in a new analysis from CCIC that was presented to the Humanitarian Response Network at the Heads of Agencies meeting and is now being shared publicly.

Please read this analysis here:  Humanitarian Spending 2019

 

 

 

 Aislynn Row is the Coordinator of the Humanitarian Response Network of Canada.

 

 

Gavin Charles is the Policy Team Lead at the Canadian Council for International Co-operation.

The Canadian Council for International Co-operation Releases Recommendations to Improve the Regulatory and Legislative Framework for Canada’s Charitable Sector

The Canadian Council for International Co-operation Releases Recommendations to Improve the Regulatory and Legislative Framework for Canada’s Charitable Sector

Ottawa, ON (15 OCT 2019) – The Canadian Council for International Co-operation (CCIC) released a policy brief today showing that Canadian charities working internationally are governed by a set of provisions that restrict their ability to partner effectively in the delivery of their charitable mandate. Titled “Directed Charities and Controlled Partnerships,” the brief examines two regulatory and legislative elements: “direction and control” provisions and anti-terror legislation.

To download the full brief, visit CCIC’s web site here: Directed Charities and Controlled Partnerships

The brief includes recommendations that are informed by a literature review, a survey of Canadian charities, and comparative research including interviews with national charity coalitions from other high-income countries. CCIC also provides recommendations for how the Government of Canada can improve the regulatory and legislative framework for Canada’s charitable sector.

This analysis provides a unique perspective on this issue specific to the international cooperation sector. It includes input from the International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group (ICLMG) which collaborated on the section concerning anti-terrorism legislation.

This policy brief was produced with the financial support of the Muttart Foundation.

 

Canadian charities working internationally are required to exercise an extremely high level of operational control in their work. Unfortunately, this can undermine principles of effective development and good partnership. Fortunately, there are ways to improve, and we can draw on the experience of other countries and the expertise within Canada’s charitable sector.

Gavin Charles

Policy Team Lead, Canadian Council for International Cooperation

Canadians expect humanitarian organizations to provide essential and live-saving support wherever it is needed, but they are being hindered in their work, despite their best efforts, by vague, broad and unnecessary anti-terrorism laws that do more to put people at risk than prevent violent crimes. Future governments should take decisive action to fix these troubling laws.

Tim McSorley

National Coordinator, International Civil Liberties Monitoring Group

Canada’s “direction and control” provisions governing Canadian charities are unusual and unique among peer countries. These rules impose a high transaction cost to Canadian funding to projects around the globe and undermine partnership relations with others. We invite the Government of Canada to engage in dialogue and consultation with Canadian charities working internationally to ensure its policy on oversight of charitable resources reflects Canada’s commitments to partnership and localization in development cooperation and humanitarian assistance.

Nicolas Moyer

President and CEO , Canadian Council for International Cooperation

Background:

  • In 2016, CCIC made a submission to the Canadian Revenue Agency’s consultation on charities’ political activities. The report is titled “Modern Charities, Ancient Policies: Public policy and Canada’s development sector” and available here.
  • In September 2018, CCIC made an oral testimony as part of the consultations in Advance of the 2019 Budget. One of the themes covered was the key role charities play in both the economic and societal success of Canada. The testimony is available here.
  • In May 2019, CCIC made a submission with a list of recommendations to the Senate’s study on the charitable sector. The document is available here.

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About the Canadian Council for International Co-operation (CCIC)
The Canadian Council for International Co-operation (CCIC) is Canada’s national association representing international development and humanitarian organizations. Together with our member organizations, CCIC seeks to end global poverty and to promote social justice and human dignity for all. CCIC is committed to making this goal a public priority and to encouraging the actions necessary to make a poverty-free world a reality.

 

Media Contact:

Thida Ith, Media and Communications Officer
tith@ccic.ca / Phone: (613) 241-7007 ext. 343/ Cell phone: (437) 779-0883

New CCIC Member: Hope and Healing International

New CCIC Member: Hope and Healing International

CCIC is happy to welcome Hope and Healing International (formerly cbm Canada) as its newest member!

Hope and Healing International has over 110 years of experience developing proven community-based programs that help millions of people break out of the poverty-disability cycle, allowing them to benefit from real, lasting change.

Hope and Healing International works with doctors, teachers, health workers, community advocates together with partners in 16 countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America. They engage Canadians passionate about giving hope and medical care to children and families trapped in the poverty-disability cycle.

The organization works on:

  • Prevention and Medical treatment
  • Rehabilitation
  • Creating Equal Opportunities

To learn more about the organization and the work that they do, please visit their site.

 

Humanitarian Organizations Sign the First Canadian Statement for Better Collaboration in the Humanitarian, Development and Peace building Sectors

Humanitarian Organizations Sign the First Canadian Statement for Better Collaboration in the Humanitarian, Development and Peace building Sectors

Members of the Humanitarian Response Network of Canada (HRN) met on September 30th in Montreal at the HRN Heads of Agency Meeting (HoA), an annual event that convenes Executive Directors and CEOs of HRN members, their senior humanitarian staff, and Government of Canada representatives to discuss their collective experience in humanitarian response. At the HoA, they confirmed their commitment to work in an integrated, inclusive and principled approach to enable better collaboration between the humanitarian, development and peace sectors. This declaration is a first of its kind made by a group of heads of agencies in Canada.

 

The statement, signed by 29 organizations, affirms that sustainable solutions for crisis-affected people must be the ultimate objective of all integrated approaches. It emphasizes the importance of collaboration between humanitarian, development, and peace initiatives, with a view to building comprehensive responses that address immediate vulnerabilities and uphold humanitarian principles while integrating more sustainable, long-term, resilience-building, and gender-responsive solutions. This can only be achieved with dedicated and increased resources allocated to all sectors, and with optimized partnerships and structures that enable flexibility to respond to needs across the humanitarian-development-peace nexus.

 

 

 

Media Statement: CCIC Congratulates the Liberal Party of Canada for Winning the 2019 Federal Election

MEDIA STATEMENT: The Canadian Council for International Co-operation Reacts to the Proposed Cuts on International Assistance in the Conservative Electoral Platform

Ottawa, ON (OCT 1, 2019) – The Canadian Council for International Co-operation (CCIC) is concerned about the 25% cut to Official Development Assistance (ODA) proposed in the Conservative Party of Canada’s electoral platform released today. In a letter sent to CCIC on June 7th, 2018, Andrew Scheer indicated: “I believe in the inherent benefits of development assistance to Canadians and the world. Conservatives are committed to strengthening Canada’s record on foreign aid.”  This aligns with public support highlighted from a recent survey:  81% of Canadians agree that Canada should do its fair share along with other countries to help developing countries.

International development and humanitarian assistance are important parts of Canada’s global leadership that contribute to visible impacts. For example, South Korea went from a major aid recipient to an important trading partner for Canada and the world. In as little as 25 years, although there is still much to do, Rwanda, after suffering a vicious genocide, has gone from crisis to great strides in social and economic development. 

The Conservative Party has a long history of leadership in international development and humanitarian assistance. The G8 Muskoka Initiative for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (MNCH) launched in 2010 by the Conservative government was widely acclaimed in Canada and abroad. CCIC welcomes further discussions with the Conservative Party of Canada on international assistance, and how Canada can continue to be a global leader in a fast changing and interconnected world.

CCIC published a media advisory and a fact sheet outlining some key figures on Canada’s role in international assistance. We also sent a survey to leaders of federal political parties on their positions regarding international co-operation issues. We invite all parties to submit their answers. The results will be published on our site here.

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About the Canadian Council for International Co-operation (CCIC)
The Canadian Council for International Co-operation (CCIC) is Canada’s national association representing international development and humanitarian organizations. Together with our member organizations, CCIC seeks to end global poverty and to promote social justice and human dignity for all. CCIC is committed to making this goal a public priority and to encouraging the actions necessary to make a poverty-free world a reality.

Media Contact:
Thida Ith, Media and Communications Officer
tith@ccic.ca / Phone: (613) 241-7007 ext. 343/ Cell phone: (437) 779-0883