Budget 2019 is a missed opportunity for Canada’s global leadership

Budget 2019 is a missed opportunity for Canada’s global leadership

The Canadian Council for International Co-operation (CCIC) – the umbrella organization representing Canada’s international development and humanitarian organizations – is disappointed that Budget 2019 does not contribute the additional resources required to achieve the ambitious targets the Government of Canada has set through its Feminist International Assistance Policy. This internationally-acclaimed policy was developed through an extensive consultation process with stakeholders in Canada and globally, including with civil society organizations.

“The vision is set. The values are clear. The verdict on Canada’s Feminist International Assistance Policy will ultimately hinge on implementation. The government has demonstrated accountability and transparency by publishing the targets it has set for itself. Yet such an ambitious new agenda for change will not be achieved without equally ambitious new resources,” says Nicolas Moyer, President-CEO of CCIC.

Whereas Budget 2018 included new investments to keep Official Development Assistance (ODA) consistent as a proportion of the economy over the next five years, this year’s budget represents a missed opportunity to take the next step by launching a timetable of sustainable increases to Canadian aid. Such a commitment will be required to meet Canada’s policy objectives and the Sustainable Development Goals. The Government of Canada will have another chance to take meaningful action at the international Women Deliver conference in Vancouver from June 3-6, 2019.

CCIC will soon launch an e-petition calling for a significant increase to Official Development Assistance and asking all political parties to make Canadian aid an election issue. Canadian citizens who care about Canada’s leadership role in the world are encouraged to #VoteAid in the upcoming election.

CCIC looks forward to continuing to work with its member organizations and the Government of Canada to help build a fairer, more sustainable, and safer world for everyone.

 

Policy Insight: While Budget 2019 indicates an additional $700 million in 2023-24 to the International Assistance Envelope (IAE), a closer look at the financial tables shows that only $100 million of this is in fact new to the IAE. The remaining amount simply maintains the IAE at the level reached through Canada’s previously announced commitments in 2018. According to CCIC’s projections, Canada’s Official Development Assistance will remain stagnant at 0.26% of Gross National Income through 2023-24, significantly below the global target of 0.7%.

What does Maryam Monsef have planned for international development?

What does Maryam Monsef have planned for international development?

Originally posted on Huffington Post Canada’s Development Unplugged

March came in like a lioness, following the testimony and ministerial resignation of Jody Wilson-Raybould. The first of the month roared with news of a Cabinet shuffle that saw long-standing Minister of International Development Marie-Claude Bibeau moved to the agriculture file.

Over the past three and a half years, Minister Bibeau worked closely with the Canadian global development and humanitarian sector to develop an ambitious agenda for Canada’s international assistance. In June 2017, Minister Bibeau announced Canada’s Feminist International Assistance Policy (FIAP), a huge step forward for gender equality and an inspiring moment for the international cooperation sector.

The evidence is clear the world over that the fight against global poverty is best served by investing in women and girls. Canada has been rallying the world to this cause. Yet in Canada, at both domestic and international policy levels, the bold ambition of gender equality is yet to be fully realized.

Against this backdrop, the appointment of Maryam Monsef for Minister of International Development, in addition to her role as Minister for Women and Gender Equality, represents a formal unification of two files that have been inextricably intertwined in recent years. There is the concern, of course, that one file might overshadow the other, or that something might be lost in the shuffle, so to speak. Both portfolios have too often suffered relegation to the margins of parliamentary interest. But there are reasons to be optimistic that this dual mandate can drive progress on gender equality both within and beyond our borders.

The same day as the Cabinet shuffle, Global Affairs Canada released Key Performance Indicators for the FIAP’s six action areas, with a focus on gender equality and empowering women and girls, signalling the government’s commitment to tracking its own progress.

A few days later, Minister Monsef launched a national advisory committee comprising 16 leaders committed to advancing gender equality and “to improve the lives of women and girls at home and around the world”, dispelling the myth that we need to choose between helping people at home and helping those elsewhere in the world. In fact, as suggested by the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals, our efforts will be much more fruitful if we do both.

Members of this new committee were joined at their first meeting by Katja Iverson of Women Deliver, the world’s largest gathering on gender equality and the health, rights, and well-being of women and girls. This year’s conference will take place in Vancouver from June 3-6, giving Canada a critical opportunity to advance gender equality on the global stage and draw attention to our country’s record on this issue.

Next week, Minister of Finance Bill Morneau will reveal the 2019 federal budget, which will include a section on Official Development Assistance – Canadian aid – detailing the percentage of Canada’s Gross National Income that the federal government is willing to contribute to ending extreme global poverty. Canada currently contributes 0.26% of GNI, which is a near record low for Canada over the four last decades, and well below the average of Canada’s peers in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. This is Canada’s opportunity to step up and prove that our country, too, is willing to do its part on the world stage.

The vision is set. The values are clear. The verdict on the government’s ambitious policy will ultimately hinge on implementation. The government has demonstrated accountability and transparency by publishing the targets it has set for itself. Yet such an ambitious new agenda for change will not be achieved without equally ambitious new resources.

With the appointment of Minister Monsef in her dual role, Canada has a chance to streamline its efforts to make gender equality a reality in Canada and around the world. Regardless of where they are born, girls and women must be offered the same opportunities as their male counterparts – to be educated, to be employed, to access healthcare, and to be leaders in their communities.

Minister Monsef now has a clear mandate to work with her Cabinet colleagues to ensure that Canada delivers for women everywhere.

 

Nicolas Moyer is the President-CEO of the Canadian Council for International Co-operation

Call for Submissions: The Karen Takacs Award

Call for Submissions: The Karen Takacs Award

Recognizing feminist advocacy & collaborative leadership in global cooperation

Overview

The Karen Takacs Award is presented annually by the Canadian Council for International Co-operation (CCIC) to an individual who has notably, by virtue of working collaboratively, made a difference in the lives of women globally. The award honours outstanding collaborative leadership and commitment to promoting women’s equality.  The winner will be honoured at the CCIC 2019 Annual General Meeting, Sunday, June 2, 2019 in Vancouver and will be given the opportunity to host a workshop to share her expertise and experience of collaborative leadership in 2019-20.

History & Context

Karen Takacs was a celebrated and cherished leader of the Canadian international community. For over 20 years, Karen worked tirelessly to improve the lives and advance the rights of women and girls locally, nationally, and internationally.

Karen was a catalyst for collaboration in the Canadian international sector. Throughout her life, Karen was admired for motivating and bringing people together around a common cause. By way of encouragement, generosity, and humour, Karen led by mobilizing and supporting others. Following Karen’s passing in 2015, the Canadian Council for International Co-operation (CCIC) created an award to honour her invaluable contribution to the fight for social and economic justice, and to celebrate the unique collaborative leadership she demonstrated throughout her career, including her time as Chair of the Board of CCIC.  For the Canadian global development community, The Karen Takacs Award is a symbol of feminism, collaboration, advocacy, mentorship, and resilience.

Recipients

  • 2016: Karen Takacs (received by her family)
  • 2017: Patricia Erb, former President and CEO of Save the Children Canada
  • 2018: Beth Woroniuk, MATCH International Women’s Fund, Women Peace and Security Network Canada
  • 2018: Kate McInturff, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (received by her family)

 

Criteria for Selection

To nominate someone for this award, please see the criteria below. Nominations must be received by April 1st, 2019.

In order to be considered for the award, a nominee must:

  • Identify as a feminist
  • Be peer-nominated
  • Be making a meaningful contribution to the rights of women and girls by challenging power structures on a global scale – for example, in relation to Indigenous peoples and migration

Expectations for Award Winner

  • Attendance at the CCIC 2019 Annual General Meeting (Sunday, June 2, 2019 in Vancouver) to receive award, either in person or by video
  • Serve on The Karen Takacs Award committee for 1 year, following the receipt of the award
  • The winner will be invited to host a leadership relevant workshop within the year the award is presented (2019-20).

 

Nomination Procedures

  • Two central nomination letters that provide an accounting of the nominee’s advocacy for women’s equality and collaborative leadership contributions. In each nomination letter, the nominator is asked to demonstrate the following:
    • Evidence of the nominee’s contributions to feminist advocacy for women and girls
    • Evidence of how the nominee has made a difference by working collaboratively
    • Evidence of how the nominee has influenced or inspired her peers
    • Evidence of how the nominee has challenged power structures on a global scale
  • Links to websites and other documentation that describes and illustrates the nominee’s advocacy work and its impact (including testimonials from those benefiting from or witnessing the activism) will be useful to the committee
  • The nominee’s curriculum vitae or resume
  • The candidate’s CV and all nomination letters should be submitted as one pdf attachment to Jessica Ruano, Communications Officer at jruano@ccic.ca
Canada Cares, and that’s worth celebrating

Canada Cares, and that’s worth celebrating

Written by Nicolas Moyer for The Hill Times

Having worked in international development and humanitarian assistance for the better part of my life, it’s easy for me to understand why some people feel discouraged. Our newspapers and Twitter feeds are filled with stories of extreme poverty, human rights violations, environmental disasters, and international conflicts that seem never-ending. And it’s true that there will always be a need for continued efforts to combat the injustices that exist in our world.

Yet this is no reason to think that nothing is changing. In fact, we have plenty to celebrate.

Life expectancy continues to rise in developing countries. Despite seemingly constant media reports of violence, the fact is that interstate conflict has decreased significantly from past decades. There are more children and adults in school and receiving healthcare than ever before. Under-five child mortality has halved since 1990. We don’t often learn about these notable accomplishments from the daily news, because the results aren’t happening fast enough to make the headlines. But they are happening.

Two years ago, the Canadian Council for International Co-operation asked a research team to poll Canadians on international development and humanitarian assistance. The goal was to find out how Canadians feel about Canadian aid – Canada’s contribution to ending global poverty. The results were beyond encouraging. Two-thirds of Canadians self-identify as supporters of international assistance, and six out of ten Canadians are proud of the leadership role that Canada plays in the world. The majority of Canadians use words like ‘compassionate’, ‘generous’, and ‘outward-looking’ to describe our country. This is a country that aspires to build bridges rather than walls.

We know that international assistance matters to Canadians and aligns with their values. Yet Canada’s Official Development Assistance (ODA), the federal funding that provides support for the world’s poorest countries, has remained stagnant at 0.26% of Gross National Income. The average contribution of OECD countries – Canada’s peer group – is well above Canada’s own, and leaders like the United Kingdom, Germany, and Norway have met the global standard of 0.7% of GNI. Canadians expect Canada to do its part on the world stage. That includes doing its part to help the poorest people in the world.

By investing in inclusive development and humanitarian assistance, Canada will help reduce forced migration and conflict. There is a strong economic case to be made for development assistance, too: a more peaceful and prosperous world is a world with less need to deploy Canadian troops, which is costly in both lives and money. But what is the number one reason that Canadians want Canada to help? Because it’s the right thing to do.

In my work, I have had the privilege of meeting incredible Canadians who choose to spend their time making a positive difference. These are the people we will be recognizing and celebrating at our 29th annual International Development Week flagship event on Tuesday, February 5 at Canada’s National Arts Centre. This event, called ‘Canada Cares’, will invite residents and visitors to the National Capital Region to engage with photo exhibits, film shorts, live performances, and interactive activities showcasing the transformative work being done by Canadians and local partners around the world.

As Canadians, we don’t often take the time to recognize our own accomplishments. So I want to take a moment to say thank you: to our neighbours, our friends, our family members, our coworkers, and to you. Whether you’re volunteering locally or abroad, protesting injustice, writing letters to your MP, creating art to raise awareness, fundraising for a good cause, or teaching your children the value of generosity – thank you for making the world a better place. Together, let’s keep making it better.

Canada Cares: IDW 2019 Celebration in Ottawa

Canada Cares: IDW 2019 Celebration in Ottawa

Canada Cares: IDW 2019 Celebration in Ottawa

International Development Week celebrates Canadians who care about Canadian aid at Canada’s National Arts Centre on Tuesday, February 5, 2019

For immediate release – Thursday, January 24, 2019

Canadians are invited to the National Capital Region to celebrate the International Development Week (IDW 2019) flagship event, Canada Cares: IDW 2019 Celebration in Ottawa, at Canada’s National Arts Centre (NAC) on Tuesday, February 5, 2019.

This free, public event brings together Canada’s international development community during Winterlude for a full day of interactive activities, workshops, and performances from 12pm to 5pm, followed by a reception from 5pm to 7pm with the Honourable Marie-Claude Bibeau, Minister of International Development.

Take a stroll through the NAC’s Canada Room and foyer where visitors will cross paths with a giant globe, a rickshaw ambulance, and a virtual reality exhibit that simulates the experience of being a humanitarian worker in the field. Get acquainted with the people on the front lines of international development work through a series of photo exhibits, film shorts, live performances, and workshops to discover how your actions can make a world of difference.

This year’s theme, Together for Gender Equality, recognizes the importance of the Feminist International Assistance Policy in championing gender equality and the health and rights of girls and women around the world, while also looking forward to Women Deliver in Vancouver, from June 3-6, 2019.

For more information about International Development Week and Canada Cares: IDW 2019 Celebration in Ottawa, please contact: 

Jessica Ruano, Communications Officer for CCIC
Email: jruano[at]ccic.ca  | Phone: 613 241 7007 ext. 343

Charmaine Crockett, Director of Stakeholder Engagement for CanWaCH
Email: ccrockett@CanWaCH.ca | Phone: 613 863 9489

Follow #IDW2019 on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram
High-resolution photos and interviews available upon request. 

A few words from the Canadian Council for International Co-operation (CCIC) and the Canadian Partnership for Women and Children’s Health (CanWaCH), co-organizers of Canada Cares: IDW2019 Celebration in Ottawa:
 
“Across Canada, people are asking ‘What more can we do to help create a stronger world?’ Our research indicates that two thirds of Canadians support international assistance, and six out of ten Canadians are proud of the leadership role that Canada plays in the world.”
 
“With growing concerns over migration, climate change, and human rights crises, Canadians are looking for opportunities to become more engaged internationally as well as at home. International Development Week provides that space for all of us to celebrate the positive difference Canada is making in the world, and explore how much more we can accomplish together.”
 
– Nicolas Moyer, President-CEO of CCIC
 
“When we all work together to achieve gender equality around the world, amazing things can happen. Canada is a global leader when it comes to advancing the health and rights of women and girls, which is the best way to tackle extreme global poverty. International Development Week is an important reminder that we need to continue investing in women-led international projects and programs that are making a difference.”
 
– Julia Anderson, Acting Executive Director of CanWaCH
International Development Week celebrates Canadians who care about Canada’s role in the world

International Development Week celebrates Canadians who care about Canada’s role in the world

Together for Gender Equality

International Development Week celebrates Canadians who care about Canada’s role in the world

From February 3-9, 2019, Canada’s international development community celebrates International Development Week (IDW 2019), an annual event that draws attention to the sector’s key achievements in ending global poverty, as well as individual Canadians working to make a difference in the world.

This year’s theme, Together for Gender Equality, recognizes the importance of the Feminist International Assistance Policy in championing gender equality and the health and rights of girls and women internationally, while also looking forward to Women Deliver in Vancouver, from June 3-6, 2019.

Over 50 organizations are hosting events across the country, including a flagship event at Canada’s National Arts Centre (NAC) in Ottawa on Tuesday February 5th from 12pm to 5pm during Winterlude. Ottawa residents and visitors to the nation’s capital are welcome to participate in interactive activities and attend performances in the NAC lobby.

For more information about IDW 2019 and related events, please contact Jessica Ruano, Communications Officer for CCIC, at 613 241 7007 ext. 343 or jruano[at]ccic.ca, and visit our website at developmentweek.ca