Improved and Expanded Version of the NextGen Database

Improved and Expanded Version of the NextGen Database

The NextGen Database has been improved and expanded!  This online, searchable database helps to identify potential new collaborators (and collaborations) for Next Generation. The database also allows the media, students, policy-makers, and the general public to identify Canadian experts working on global sustainable development issues including international development and humanitarian assistance, but also on domestic issues related to the sustainable development goals (SDGs).

The NextGen database launched in 2017 and in its second phase in 2019, NextGen teamed up with the Sustainable Development Solutions Network Canada to link research in Canada to relevant SDGs by mapping areas of research around the SDGs/ Agenda 2030. NextGen mapped areas of research to the SDGs agenda to identify how researchers in Canada contribute to the implementation and understanding of the SDGs.

The Nextgen database is part of the Next Generation – Collaboration for Development program, a partnership between the Canadian Council for International Co-operation (CCIC) and the Canadian Association for the Study of International Development (CASID).

To learn more about the NextGen database, click here.

Canadian Lutheran World Relief: A Long-Standing History of Responding to Injustice Around the World

Canadian Lutheran World Relief: A Long-Standing History of Responding to Injustice Around the World

Interview with Rev. Dr. Karin Achtelstetter, Executive Director of CLWR

As we commemorated World Humanitarian Day just a few days ago, we wanted to profile one of our members who has had a long experience working in humanitarian assistance around the world. In this edition of Spotlight on our Members, we spoke with Rev. Dr. Karin Achtelstetter to learn more about the work of Canadian Lutheran World Relief.

CCIC: What do you think other organizations can learn from CLWR’s work?

Karin Achtelstetter: Next year is our 75th year responding to disaster, conflict and injustice around the world, and we’ve learned a lot in that time. But I think the most important thing isn’t what we’ve already learned—it’s that we’re still learning. That posture is critically important in our sector.

I’m proud that we’re continuing to grow as we learn from the local organizations we partner with around the world, as we learn from the people our projects serve, and as we learn from our colleagues in this work through networks like CCIC. One of the ways that learning has shaped us the most is in the way we respond to the global refugee crisis – everything from emergency humanitarian assistance to long-term development support to refugee resettlement in Canada.

CCIC: Since World Humanitarian Day was only a few days ago, could you share how CLWR works to address the humanitarian-development nexus and to address both short-term needs as well as long-term sustainable development?

KA: Our story as an organization begins with displacement, with help given to refugees of war back in 1946, and we’ve grown to an organization that focuses on a holistic response to displacement, forced migration, and food insecurity.

Much of our humanitarian assistance work around the world continues to focus on internally displaced people (IDPs) and refugees in places like Ethiopia, Uganda, DRC, South Sudan, Jordan, and Myanmar. Approaching this work from a human rights-based perspective means that we must not only pay attention to meeting short-term needs, but also address the ongoing barriers to advancing human rights and improving quality of life.

So, in a place like Myanmar where so many Rohingya have been displaced, we’re working with women and girls in IDP camps to provide basic language, literacy and leadership skills so that they can take a more active role in community decision-making processes and accessing services. With a view to the future, these skills will also prepare them for future resettlement as it will allow for increased interactions with their ethnic Rakhine neighbours.

“Approaching this work from a human rights-based perspective means that we must not only pay attention to meeting short-term needs, but also address the ongoing barriers to advancing human rights and improving quality of life.”

CCIC: CLWR have designated young adult board members. How do you perceive the role of young people in your work and how has your board been influenced by those young adult members?

KA: Young people aren’t just the future of our work – they’re our present. We’re so proud that as our founding generation passes the torch, there are so many young Canadians who are so committed to challenging injustice.

Youth engagement can’t just be a way to try to convince young people to donate, because they want and deserve more than that. We need their perspectives and we need them to challenge us as an organization to be the best we can. Their voice is so valuable, so a board without young adult board members is unthinkable for CLWR. Young adult board members very often bring new perspectives to critical discussions about our work and future, and they make sure we’re linked to their communities and hearing those voices we need.

CCIC: We are proud to have CLWR among our membership. What does CLWR value about its membership with CCIC and how would you like to see this relationship grow in the future?

KA: CLWR really values its engagement in various CCIC working groups including the Food Security Policy Group, the Humanitarian Response Network, and the Humanitarian Policy and Advocacy Group. Having the chance to network, learn, and advocate with other CCIC members on relevant issues strengthens our ability to carry out our mission and provide quality programming. As a primarily Winnipeg based organization, we are excited by CCIC’s recent efforts to provide more opportunities to members outside of Ottawa/Toronto and would like to see this continue to grow.

“Young people aren’t just the future of our work – they’re our present. We’re so proud that as our founding generation passes the torch, there are so many young Canadians who are so committed to challenging injustice.”

Rev. Dr. Karin Achtelstetter

Rev. Dr. Karin Achtelstetter

Executive Director of Canadian Lutheran World Relief

Rev. Dr. Karin Achtelstetter is Executive Director of Canadian Lutheran World Relief.

Prior to CLWR, she was the General Secretary of the World Association for Christian Communication. She also has extensive experience working with CLWR partners including The Lutheran World Federation, ACT Alliance and the World Council of Churches.

As an ordained Lutheran pastor and through her years of executive leadership experience, she has firsthand experience working with churches, grassroots communities and project partners around the world.

In her work with CLWR, Karin champions a focus on empowering girls and women throughout CLWR’s programming.

Podcast: Susanna Moorehead, Chair of the OECD’s Development Assistance Committee (DAC)

Podcast: Susanna Moorehead, Chair of the OECD’s Development Assistance Committee (DAC)

In this episode of Development Unplugged, we’re talking to Susanna Moorehead, Chair of the OECD’s Development Assistance Committee (DAC).

She was on a visit to Ottawa in July, where she has been meeting with key partners in government, civil society and with the private sector. She has agreed to spend some time with us to discuss civil society’s space in Canada, and Canada’s place in the world.

Twitter Takeover On International Youth Day

Twitter Takeover On International Youth Day

August 12 is International Youth Day and for that day, we are handing over our Twitter account to Laveza Khan, a member the Emerging Leaders Network. Laveza will highlight the role of young people in strengthening and promoting the international development sector and the broader civil society community.

As the Gender Equality & Sustainable Development Coordinator at Alberta Council for Global Cooperation, Laveza is responsible for supporting and advocating for civil society organization (CSOs) in Alberta that are working locally and globally to achieve sustainable human development. Through her work, Laveza engages with civil society, private sector and multiple levels of government to work collectively to advance the Sustainable Development Goals in Alberta, Canada and around the world.

She completed her postgraduate studies at Humber College in International Development and has an Honours BA from McMaster University in Labour Studies and Sociology. Laveza is the North American Representative on the Action for Sustainable Development’s Facilitation Group. In 2018, Laveza was selected for the Women Deliver Young Leaders Program and is committed to advancing gender equality and women’s rights both locally and globally.

Follow us on Twitter and join the conversation! CCIC (@CCCICCIC) and Laveza Khan (@LavezaKhan)

Summer Webinar Series: Exploring Critical Gaps in SRHR

CCIC is pleased to collaborate with Action Canada and CanWaCH on a series of webinars that will discuss some of the identified gap areas of sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR). The webinars will bring together experts from international partners and Canadian civil society organizations to discuss integrative programming and best practices for programming in these areas.

On June 4, 2019, the Government of Canada announced an annual investment of $1.4b for women’s and children’s health between 2020-2030 with $700m/year earmarked for sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) with a focus on the neglected areas. With this new commitment, Canada is positioned to become the single largest country donor for comprehensive SRHR in the world.

More recently, Global Affairs Canada launched the “Health and Rights for Women, Adolescent Girls and Children” call for proposals. With $325 million over five years, selected projects will improve the quality of, access to, and demand for integrated health services and information for women, adolescents, and children at the community, health facility, and health system levels. 50% of the funding will be earmarked for critical gap areas of SRHR including:

  • Reproductive health services
  • Comprehensive sexuality education
  • Family planning and contraceptives
  • Safe and legal abortion and post-abortion care
  • Sexual and gender-based violence (including child, early and forced marriage, and female genital mutilation and cutting)
  • Advocacy activities for SRHR

Join us throughout August and September in our series of webinars where the objectives are:

  1. To share expertise and build capacity on the most neglected areas of SRHR;
  2. To demonstrate best practices and integrative SRHR programming;
  3. To build partnerships and networks among organizations working on SRHR in different capacities.

The schedule and themes are as follows:

  • Wednesday, August 14, 10am-11am EDT: Safe and legal abortion and post-abortion care
  • Wednesday, August 21, 10am-11am EDT: Comprehensive sexuality education
  • Wednesday, August 28, 10am-11am EDT: Advocacy activities for SRHR
  • Wednesday, September 4, 10am-11am EDT: Family planning and contraceptives.

To register, click here.

Podcast: Gender-Lens Investing

Podcast: Gender-Lens Investing

Innovative Development Finance Podcast Series

In this episode of our series on innovative development finance, we discuss gender-lens investing and hear some examples of how this has been harnessed effectively. Our guests also share how this approach can be used by non-profits to advance their program objectives.

Our guests are Ryan Clark (Global Issues and Development Branch, Global Affairs Canada), Joy Anderson (Criterion Institute) and Jessica Villanueva (MEDA).

The other episodes of the series on Innovative Development Finance are:

To listen to other episodes in this series or other podcasts published by CCIC, please visit our website here.